Help sort information into one of two categories-fact or opinion-by using these blank charts.

What is the Difference Between a Fact and an Opinion? Many people tend to get confused between the terms 'fact' and 'opinion.' They think of these terms as same. However, they are not. There is a world of difference between the two. A 'fact' is a statement that is universally accepted and can be proved as a true or false statement. On the other hand, an 'opinion' is a statement that is given by a person based on their own judgement. It is based on a person's feelings that can't be proven. Let's understand the two with an example: Fact: Fewer cars on the road mean fewer accidents, less pollution, and traffic noise. Opinion: Mass transportation can be a solution to bumper to bumper traffic that we experience every day. I feel terrible about the smoggy view we see when we are on a highway. Opinions are more towards emotional language, while facts can be checked for being either true or false. Therefore, before you make any judgement, make sure to read through and understand carefully, or better yet, ask yourself the question, 'are facts reliable?' or 'are the opinions based on facts?'

Isn't it interesting how people can look at the same facts and hold different opinions about them? At least you'll be able to tell which is which. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, but not to their own facts. We may argue over whether the Metric or Imperial system of measurement is better, but no one can deny that a foot is twelve inches or one hundred centimeters make a meter. Introduce your students to the scientific method, responsible journalism, or general critical thinking by using these charts to designate whether given statements are independently verifiable, or just a personal belief.

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Printable Fact and Opinion Organizers

Click the buttons to print each organizer.

2 Rows Fact / Opinion

For listing collections of facts and opinions about a topic listed in the designated header.

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2 Rows Fact / Opinion / Statement

Same as above, but with a central column for noting specific statements about the topic.

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3 Rows Fact / Opinion

Three rows are provided for larger lists of facts and opinions, or multiple participants.

3 Rows Fact / Opinion / Statement

Same as above, but with a central column for noting specific statements about the topic.

4 Rows Fact / Opinion

Four rows are provided for larger lists of facts and opinions, or multiple participants.

4 Rows Fact / Opinion / Statement

Same as above, but with a central column for noting specific statements about the topic.

5 Rows Fact / Opinion

Five rows are provided for larger lists of facts and opinions, or multiple participants.

5 Rows Fact / Opinion / Statement

Same as above, but with a central column for noting specific statements about the topic.

6 Rows Fact / Opinion

Six rows are provided for larger lists of facts and opinions, or multiple participants.

6 Rows Fact / Opinion / Statement

Same as above, but with a central column for noting specific statements about the topic.