Use these sheets in research to denote data that are pluses, minuses, and interesting.

When it comes to making tough decisions and through critical thinking, there are a lot of tools that they can use. These tools help students understand complex issues and make well-thought decisions. There is one smart tool that students are encouraged to use during brain storming activities and that is the PMI chart. Whether you are trying to choose a course of action, constructing (or deconstructing) an argument, or conducting research, you need a way to quickly qualify the facts and opinions you discover. For starters, PMI is an acronym for 'plus,' 'minus,' and 'interesting' or 'implications.' It is brainstorming, decision making, and critical thinking tool. It helps students in analyzing and understanding complex issues it also allows them to make fully backed up decisions. These charts were created by Edward de Bono in 1992. It is way to discuss the pros and cons of a topic. Build sufficient support for a decision after listing the factors that work in its favor and those that don't.

These blank templates give you labeled spaces that allow for fast and clear sorting so you have a reference later on. The complexity of your project will help determine which sheet to use, based on the number of available rows for data. Note: These charts make excellent companion sheets when used in conjunction with the Persuasion sheets or the Fact and Opinion sheets located elsewhere on this site.

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Printable PMI Charts

Click the buttons to print each organizer.

Standard PMI Chart

Three unbroken vertical columns for small subjects or general sorting. This is the common starting point when using these types of templates. As your need for more information increases, you will want to scroll down the page for those templates.

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3 Row Chart

The PMI columns are divided into three rows for tracking multiple variables or subjects. This allows you to section things off into three compartments. This can be helpful when using a timeline of sorts.

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4 Row PMI Chart

The columns are divided into four rows for tracking multiple variables or subjects. Grow through this more and see what it makes you do.

5 Row PMI Chart

The columns are divided into five rows for tracking multiple variables or subjects. I wish I could use this one a lot more because it prints so nicely and is so applicable to most content areas.

6 Row PMI

The columns are divided into six rows for tracking multiple variables or subjects.

7 Row PMI

The columns are divided into seven rows for tracking multiple variables or subjects.

8 Row PMI

The columns are divided into eight rows for tracking multiple variables or subjects.