In these worksheets, students will to determine if events are mutually exclusive, independent, or complements and how to calculate the probability of mutually exclusive events.

What is the Probability of Mutually Exclusive Events? When you're dwelling in the deep world of statistics, there is a concept which encapsulates the entire field of natural mathematics. That concept is the occurrence of mutually exclusive events. Mutually Exclusive Event are those events which cannot occur at the same time. Let's take the example of a coin toss, in which you can either get heads or tails. Now the probability of any mutually exclusive event depends on the number of occurrences possible. In other words, if you have a dice, you have a maximum of six possibilities out of which one will occur. However, considering a coin toss, there is a 50-50 chance of any occurrence.

In these worksheets, students will dive deeper into the study of probability. A basic understanding of the concept of probability and how to calculate probability is required. In these worksheets, students will learn what the terms mutually exclusive, independent, and complement mean and how they apply to probability. Students will determine if the probability of an event is mutually exclusive, independent, or complement. Students will learn how to calculate the probability of mutually exclusive events. This set of worksheets contains step-by-step solutions to sample problems, both simple and more complex problems, a review, and a quiz. It also includes ample worksheets for students to practice independently. When finished with this set of worksheets, students will know how to determine if events are mutually exclusive, independent, or complements and how to calculate the probability of mutually exclusive events. These worksheets explain how to determine if events are mutually exclusive, independent, or complements and how to calculate the probability of mutually exclusive events. Sample problems are solved and practice problems are provided.

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Probability of Mutually Exclusive Events Worksheets

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Lesson

We show you how to solve this problem: One card is drawn from a standard deck of cards. Find the probability of drawing a black card or a Jack card. A sample problem is solved, and two practice problems are provided.

Mutually Exclusive Events, Independent Events, and Complement of an Event Worksheet

Students will determine if events are mutually exclusive, independent, or complements. Ten problems are provided.

Practice

Ten problems like these: A bag has numbers 1 to 15 on separated toys. Drawing a toy having a number multiple of 5 and then drawing a toy having number multiple of 3 from the same bag. Are these events mutually exclusive? A card is drawn from a pack of 30 cards numbered form 1 to 30 What is the complement of drawing a number which is a multiple of 5?

Review Page 1

You will be shown how to explain: One card is drawn from a standard deck of cards. Find the probability of drawing a red card or a King.

Review Page 2

Problems we work through: Getting an odd number on the number cube and getting heads on a dime. Is this an independent event?

Quiz

Students will demonstrate their proficiency in determining if events are mutually exclusive, independent, or complements. Ten problems are provided.

Check

This is a great way to either introduce or review the concepts of mutually exclusive, independent, or complements. Three problems are provided, and space is included for students to copy the correct answer when given.

Lesson

This worksheet explains how to solve this problem: What is the probability of drawing an Ace of black cards from a standard deck of 52 cards.

Probability Mutually Exclusive Events Worksheet

Students will calculate the probability of mutually exclusive events such as: Rogan has a pair of dice and he throws them toward the wall then, What is the probability that the sum of the numbers appears is 8?

Practice

We will work through ten problems that are provided for you. Here is an example problem: A box has 20 balls and 25 percent of them are defective. If two balls are drawn, then find the probability that two balls are not defective.

Review and Practice

We will tackle problems that are more out there than the previous sheets. Here is a sample: . A committee of 3 members is to be formed from a group of 2 men and 4 women. Find the probability that a particular person is always in the committee

Quiz

Students will demonstrate their proficiency in calculating the probability of mutually exclusive events. Ten problems are provided.

Check

This is a great way to review the concepts of this entire section. Three problems are provided, and space is included for students to copy the correct answer when given.