Colons provide your readers a breath in the form of a pause.

This is one of the most abused and misused forms of punctuation center to the English language. Colons are used to clarify what is meant by the writer. They are a form punctuation that help us introduce an item or series of them. The main objective with their use is to present the information in a much more digestible manner for your readers or audience. The words that follow a colon generally are not capitalized, but if a complete sentence follows the colon capitalization is appropriate to be used. Avoid using colons if they are to be followed by a preposition or verb because it will not flow in an ordinary sentence. Much confusion surrounds the use of colons versus semi-colons. This is because they look very similar but have very different uses. The colon is meant to offer a pause in the reading, usually to introduce related information. The pause adds a sense of a dramatic effect which can impact how your words are valued by your audience. Rather than a simple pause, a semicolon offers a hard stop to the reader.

The semicolon is often used to join two clauses that are more commonly separate sentences. In affect semicolons produce a longer overall sentence. This series of worksheets will explore the uses of these forms of punctuation. Students begin by identifying which form should be used in premade sentences. We then expand to using them in full paragraph forms. As usual, our goal is to have students learn their use in their own works. We start by having students create their own sentences all the time while using colons along the way. The secondary goal in this collection is to understand when and how to use semi-colons and understand the root differences between the two forms of punctuation mark.

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Printable Colon Worksheets

Click the buttons to print each worksheet and answer key.

Colon or Semicolon?

Read each sentence below. Does it use the correct punctuation? Write correct or incorrect on the line. Then, rewrite the incorrect sentences on the back of this page, using the correct punctuation.

When to Use It?

To introduce a list, when the list follows an independent clause. To introduce a quotation when the quotation is not part of an independent clause. To introduce an explanation when the explanation follows an independent clause.

Colons and Semi-colons

Correct each sentence by adding a the proper form of punctuationwhere it is needed.

The Colon

Place it where it is required within each sentence. Write the number of the rule that applies on the line.

7 Ways to Use Them

We review the different ways they are used and then we put it into action.

Using It In Your Own Writing

Write 5 original sentences using colons or semi-colons. Follow the prompts that are listed on the worksheet.

Let's See What We Know

Read each sentence below. Does it use the correct punctuation? Write correct or incorrect on the line. Then, rewrite the incorrect sentences on the back of this page, using the correct punctuation.

Colon or Semicolon?

Read each sentence below. Does it use the correct punctuation? Write correct or incorrect on the line. Then, rewrite the incorrect sentences on the back of this page, using the correct punctuation.

When to Use Semis

Read each sentence below. On the line, write the letter of the function that the semicolon is serving in each sentence.

Pairs of Sentences

Combine each pair of sentences using the needed form of punctuation.

That's Missing Something

Read each quotation. Then rewrite the sentence, using a colon.

Semicolons and Conjunctive Adverbs

A semicolon can be used to separate two independent clauses that are joined by a conjunctive adverb. Write an original sentence for each conjunctive adverb given below. Use your favorite form of punctuation.

Smash'em Together

Combine each pair of sentences into a single sentence.

Correct Me!

Add or delete the required punctuation or write "no correction."

Commas, Colons, and Semi-colons

Select the correct punctuation mark from inside the parentheses.