This collection of worksheets will teach your students the difference between simple and compound subjects.

The subjects of sentences can be simple or complex, as these activity sheets will demonstrate. Activities include identifying whether specified subjects are simple or complex, identifying both complex and simple subjects in a given sentence, unscrambling sentences to find the simple or complex subjects, converting simple subjects into complex subjects, and more. Answer sheets have been provided for worksheets for instructors, but please note that in some cases, your students' answers will vary. In many cases the simple and complete subject can be one in the same. We try to create sheets that don't have this happen often.

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Printable Simple and Compound Subjects Worksheets

Click the buttons to print each worksheet and answer key.

Are They The Same Worksheet

Sometimes They Are The Same

Are the underlined word(s) a simple subject (SS) or a compound subject (CS)? Write your answer on the line.

Simple Worksheet

So Simple

Underline the simple subject in each sentence. Use the examples to help your understand what is expected of you.

Compound Worksheet

So Compound

Underline the compound subject. Write the simple subject on the line.

Classify Worksheet

Simple or Compound?

Focus on the terms that are underlined and classify them. Write in the best answer that is provided with each sentence.

Simple Worksheet

Simple Subjects

Unscramble each sentence. Write it on the line. Underline the simple subject.

Transition Worksheet

Transform Them

Underline the simple subject in each sentence. Then expand each sentence by turning the simple subject into a compound subject. Write your new sentence on the lines.

Identify Worksheet

Simple and Compound Subjects

Identify the form of the subject present in each sentence. You will label each on the line that is provided

More Identification Worksheet

More Identification

Identify the purpose of each of the underlined terms. This one will give that extra practice that you may need..

Predicate Worksheet

The Simplest

Circle the simple subject. Underline the simple predicate.

Sort Out Worksheet

Sort Out The Subjects

Each word or set of words below is the subject of a sentence. Sort them into the proper categories. Take your time and read them a few times to make sure.

Expand That Worksheet

Expand That

Circle the simple subject in each sentence. Then write a new sentence, expanding the sentence to make the subject compound.

Underline and Then Circle Worksheet

Underline and Then Circle

You will independently identify each of the subject types and clearly mark where they are present.

Blast Worksheet

Subject Blast

Some neat sentences can be found in this section.

Forms Worksheet

Compound Forms

Evaluate all the sentences and see where these terms of interest are located and then point them out to us.

They Have Both Worksheet

They Have Both

Each sentence below has a compound subject. Rewrite the sentences, deleting words as necessary so that the sentence only has a simple subject.

Picture Worksheet

Picture Fills

Look at each picture. Write two sentences to describe it; one with a simple subject, and one with a complete subject.

Simple Worksheet

Underline Simples

Underline the simple subject in each of the sentences that are presented to you.

In the End Worksheet

In the End

Underline the complete subject. Write the simple subject on the line.

Find It Worksheet

Find the Basics

The Simple subject is a main word or a group of words that tells whom or what the sentence is about. The Complete subject is all the words that tell whom or what a sentence is about.

Unscramble Worksheet

Unscrambles

Unscramble each sentence. Write it on the line. Underline what is asked of you at each step of the way.

Creating Them Worksheet

Creating Them

Underline the simple subject in each sentence. Then expand each sentence by turning the simple subject into a complete subject. Write your new sentence on the lines.

Under That Line Worksheet

What's Under That Line?

Are the underlined word(s) a simple subject (SS) or a complete subject (CS)? Write your answer on the line.

Take It To You Worksheet

Take It To You

Are the underlined words the simple or complete subject? Write your answer on the line.

Circle It Worksheet

Circle It

You will follow the example that is setup for you at each step of the way.

My Backpack Worksheet

What's in My Backpack?

Classify what you see as you read all of these statements about your backpack.

Find It Worksheet

Find It All

You will work off of the statement that you are given. you will classify parts of it and then you will rewrite the whole thing.

Get Under Worksheet

Get Under It!

You will diagnose the grammar that setup in all of these sentences and we'll see how you make out.

What's That? Worksheet

What's That?

We are classifying several parts of these sentence in this activity. Make sure to brush up by viewing each of the examples.

Sentence Worksheet

Sentence Squasher

In each case you will read a series of sentences and point out what is asked for.

Delete that Worksheet

Delete That

Rewrite each of the sentences, deleting words as necessary so that the sentence makes sense and flows well based on what we have learned thus far.

What Are Simple and Compound Subjects In Sentences?

Lack of sentence variation is one of the most significant weaknesses in writing nowadays. If you've also been dealing with this problem, a proper understanding of the different types of sentences will help. To improve your comprehension of sentence types, you need to be more aware of the varying subjects within sentences. In particular, simple and complex subjects should be at your fingertips.

This piece would give you a good grounding in simple and compound subjects. The simple and compound sentences in which these subjects are found will also be discussed. So, without further ado, let's get right into it…

Types of Sentences

Sentences are generally divided into four types. These include simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences.

Simple Sentence

A sentence is considered simple if it offers a complete thought and includes a subject and a verb. "Independent clause" is another name for a simple sentence. Below are some examples of simple sentences.

- I am a chef.
(The subject is "I" while the verb is "am")

- Kevin opened the door.
("Kevin" is the subject while "door" is the verb)

- She ate her lunch on the kitchen table.
("She" is the subject, and "ate" is the verb)

All the above examples include simple subjects (Kevin, I). Moreover, you can see that no conjunctions are added anywhere, be it at the start of a sentence or the end. Each statement displays a complete and fully independent thought.

Complex Sentence

In a complex sentence, independent and dependent clauses are typically connected by adding a conjunction. The subject then becomes a "complex subject." Consider the following example.

- When I reached home after work yesterday

There's a dependent clause in the above phrase. No complete thought has been expressed here, and the statement cannot stand on its own. An independent clause needs to be added to complete the thought and provide proper context to the reader.

- When I reached home after work yesterday, I worked out in my backyard for some time.

- "I worked out in my backyard for some time" is an independent clause in the statement above. Here's another example of a complex sentence.

- I love my job because I learn something new every day.

The example above includes the independent clause "I love my job." This is followed by the dependent clause "because I learn something new every day." The connection between the independent and dependent clauses makes this statement a complex sentence.

Types of Subjects

The "subject" is usually the agent or doer carrying out some action in any sentence. Moreover, something that an event or state refers to can also be the subject. Simply put, anything or anyone described in a sentence is usually the subject.

Simple Subject

Simple subject is the main word or bunch of words (phrase) that a particular sentence describes. Common nouns, proper nouns, and pronouns can all be simple subjects within a sentence. Below are some examples.

- My wife is a doctor.
- The small pastry shop on the north side of the street has closed down.
- You can request a refund if you are not satisfied with the quality.
- On Sundays is when we talk the most.

Complete Subject

A simple subject accompanied by its modifiers becomes a complete subject. The modifiers are all the other words that come with a simple subject. Below are some examples.

- My wife is a doctor.
- The small pastry shop on the north side of the street has closed down.

Compound Subject

A compound subject comprises two or more is connected by a conjunction such as "and." The multiple subjects share the same verb. Consider the following examples.

- The property owner and the tenant have become good friends.
- The writer or the editor will know.