Formal writers and popular authors say you should never use passive voice, but it has its place.

When determining if a sentence is in active or passive voice, the use of any version of "to be" before a verb, such as "had been seen by" or "were sent by" is a good indicator of passive voice. Teach your students the difference between the two voices, as well as good times to use each, with the exercises in the following collection of worksheets. Questionnaires and answer keys are provided.

Note: Passive voice is used by many crime reporters in newspapers when specific perpetrators are unknown but the facts must be presented.

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Print Active and Passive Voice Worksheets

Click the buttons to print each worksheet and associated answer key.

Active Voice vs. Passive Voice

Convert each sentence form active to passive or from passive to active.

Active vs. Passive 2

We threw some interestingly longer sentences in there.

Extended Sentences

We added a bit of difficulty by adding and extension to the size of the sentence output for you.

A to P 3

More work in the same direction for you.

Interesting Interaction

If you read into these sentences, you'll have a ball.

Full Court Press

Determine if each sentence is written in active or passive voice. Underline the "doer" in each sentence. Remember, the "doer" may not be the subject of the sentence.

Round 2

We cover every format you saw on the previous worksheets.

Write It!

Write two active and passive voice sentences

Determination

Determine if the sentence is written in active or passive voice. Then rewrite the sentence using the opposite voice.

Label and Write It

First understand the intent of the sentence, than switches the intent of the sentence.