It may be confusing at first, but these worksheets will help your students learn about clauses.

Clauses are the building blocks of good, clear writing. The following collection of worksheets offers activities to help teach your students how to construct, identify, and punctuate the different types of clauses. Answer keys have been provided for the instructor, but please note that in many cases the students’ answers will vary, so those answer keys should just be used as a rough guideline rather than as a definitive answer.

In prevailing theories of English grammar, the hierarchy is: words (parts of speech), phrases, and then clauses. Instructors may want to structure their lesson plans accordingly.

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Print Clause Worksheets

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Find the Subordinate Clause

Underline the subordinate clause in each sentence below. Box in the coordinating conjunction.

Commas and Introductory Elements

An introductory element is a word, phrase, or clause that begins a sentence, appearing before the main clause.

Identifying Clauses

Identify the subjects and predicates in each clause. On the line, indicate the number of clauses in each sentence.

Identifying Clauses

A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a predicate. The main clause (independent clause) expresses a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence.

Joining Clauses

Join the sentences below into single sentences by turning one or more independent clauses into subordinating or coordinating clauses. Do not remove any information as your transform the sentences.

Finding Subordinates

Where is that pesky subordinate clause?

Fill in the Blank Story Time

The story below is missing important clauses. Fill in the blanks with clauses to complete the sentences.

Act Like Adjectives

Rewrite each set of sentences so that it is a single sentence using a relative clause.

What is the Relative Clause Modifying?

Each sentence below contains a relative clause. Underline the relative clause. Then circle the noun that it modified.

Creating Subordinate Clauses

On a separate page, join the sentences below into single sentences by turning one or more independent clauses into subordinating or coordinating clauses.

Adverb Clauses

Like all clauses, an adverb clause has a subject and a verb, but because it contains a subordinating conjunction, it cannot stand alone as a sentence.

Identifying Clauses

A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a predicate. The main clause (independent clause) expresses a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence.

Introductory Clauses

Add commas where needed to set off the clauses in the sentences below.

Relative Clauses and What they Modify

Each sentence below contains a relative clause. What does the clause modify? Write the word on the line.

Quick Quiz

This is more like a flash flood quiz.