Here is a collection of activity sheets that will teach your students all about adverbs.

Adverbs are words that modify verbs, adjectives, even other adverbs. They describe the manner in which something was done, when or where something happens, and to what degree or purpose. Many adverbs end in "-ly," which makes them easier to identify (but watch out for adjectives that end in "-ly," such as "friendly" or "lovely"). Please note: While answer sheets have been provided for the instructor where necessary, in some cases, answers will vary by student.

Fun Project Idea: Have your students perform the Schoolhouse Rock "Lolly, Lolly, Lolly" song (available on YouTube) for extra reinforcement of the definition and use of adverbs.

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Print Adverb Worksheets

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Adjective to Adverb

Adjectives that describe a noun can become adverbs when the sentence is rewritten so that the verb is described instead. Rewrite each sentence below to make the adjectives work as adverbs.

-ly Me!

You can turn many adjectives into adverbs by adding –ly to theend of the adjective. If the adjective ends in a consonant then y, change the y to i before adding –ly. If the adjective ends in a vowel then an l, keep the l and add an additional –ly

Frequency Adverbs

Some adverbs tell us how often the verb in the sentence happens. Read each sentence below. Then rewrite it, including the adverb in parentheses.

Adverbs that Tell When

Adverbs can give us more information about a verb by telling us when something happened, or is happening. Complete each sentence with an adverb that makes sense.

Comparative Forms of Adverbs

Adverbs that end in -ly need an extra modifier to help them make these forms. Complete the chart with the correct comparative adverb forms. Follow the example.

Comparative and Superlative Adverbs

Comparative adverbs compare the action of two people or things. Superlative adverbs compare the action (verb) of a group larger than two. Example: Hank arrived the soonest.

Improving Sentences with Adverbs

An adverb gives more information about a verb in a sentence. Adverbs answer the questions how, how much, where, or when.

Identifying Adverbs

Box in the adverb or adverbial phrase. Underline the verb it modifies.

Writing with Adverbs

An adverb gives more information about a verb in a sentence. Adverbs answer the questions how, how much, where, or when. Read each sentence below. Then rewrite it, adding information that answers the question in parentheses.

Using Adverbs

An adverb gives more information about a verb in a sentence. Adverbs answer the questions how, how much, where, or when. Rewrite each sentence below so that it includes the type of adverb indicated.

Adding Detail

An adverb gives more information about a verb in a sentence. Adverbs answer the questions how, how much, where, or when. Read each sentence below. Then rewrite it three ways, each time adding information that answers the question in the left column..

Types of Adverbs

An adverb gives more information about a verb in a sentence. Adverbs answer the questions how, how much, where, or when. Read each sentence below. Determine what kind of information the adverb is providing.

Writing With Them

An adverb gives more information about a verb in a sentence. Adverbs answer the questions how, how much, where, or when. Demonstrate your understanding of adverbs by writing original sentences that contain adverbs that answer the questions in the left-hand column.

Even More Writing

An adverb gives more information about a verb in a sentence. Adverbs answer the questions how, how much, where, or when. Demonstrate your understanding of adverbs by writing original sentences that contain adverbs that answer the questions in the left-hand column. Use the pictures for inspiration.

Circle Me!

Circle the adverb. On the line, write whether the adverb tells how, when, or where.