These worksheets will teach your students how to identify and use sentence supporting details correctly.

Sentences may be a central topic, or a detail that supports the central topic. This collection of activity sheets will help your students learn how to distinguish between the two. Activities include identifying whether a given sentence is a topic or a detail, using concept maps to parse out given information into their correct locations, creating supporting details for given topic sentences, and more. Answer sheets are provided, but in some cases, answers will vary.

What's the old saying? "The Devil Is In The Details!" I might have confused that with that Contract Law class I took in college too. Thirty worksheets teach how to write persuasive content that supports main sentences.

Get Free Worksheets In Your Inbox!


Printable Supporting Details Worksheets

Click the buttons to print each worksheet and answer key.

Identifying Supporting Details

Write TS for Topic Sentence next to the sentence that would make a good topic sentence. Write SD for Supporting Detail next to the sentence that would make a good supporting detail.

Crossout the Details

Cross out the detail that does not support the topic sentence.

Recognizing Supporting Details

Read each group of sentences. One of them is a topic sentence, and the other two provide supporting details. Circle the letters of the sentences that provide supporting details.

Understanding Concept Maps

Demonstrate your understanding of a concept map by filling in each box below with the correct letter. some letters will be used more than once.

Identifying Supporting Details

Read each pair of sentences. Underline the sentence that would make a good supporting detail.

Deconstructing Paragraphs

Taking minutes (notes) during a meeting is very important. Effective meeting minutes capture essential information; they are not meant to record everything that was discussed during the meeting. Meeting minutes also are a way to document decisions that were made during the meeting.

Label The Parts

Read the paragraph. Label each sentence: - Topic Sentence - Major Detail - Minor Detail - Concluding Sentence

Give Me Three

Add three supporting details to go with each topic sentence.

Topic Sentence or Supporting Evidence?

Read each pair of sentences. Circle TS for Topic Sentence or SD for Supporting Detail next each sentence.

Identifying the Pieces

Read the assigned paragraph. Fill out the concept map. You may not use all boxes. Add additional boxes as necessary.

Brush It Up!

Read the paragraph. Then answer the questions.

Concept Maps

A concept map is a way to show relationships among ideas in a text. There are many different styles of concept maps, but they all follow the same basic pattern.

No Details At All

Read each topic sentence. Cross out the sentence that does not provide a supporting detail for the topic sentence.

Good Details

Underline the sentence that would make a good supporting detail.

Identifying Supporting Details

Read the assigned paragraph. Fill out the concept map. Draw a bold line around the boxes that you need; you may not use all boxes.

More Than The Main Idea

List the major supporting details that support the main idea. What is the paragraph's main idea?

Using Details to Support the Main Idea

Put an X next to each sentence that includes a detail about the main idea.

Cross Out

Read each topic sentence. Cross out the sentence that does not provide a supporting detail for the topic sentence.

Supporting Details Worksheet

Write down at least three of the supporting details that the author uses to support the assertion that bull riding is the most dangerous sport in the world.

Identifying Supporting Details

Read the assigned paragraph. Fill out the concept map. Draw a bold line around the boxes that you need; you may not use all boxes. Add additional boxes as necessary.

Identifying Supporting Details

Read each pair of sentences. Write TS for Topic Sentence next to the sentence that would make a good topic sentence. Write SD for Supporting Detail next to the sentence that would make a good supporting detail.

Supporting Details

Cross out the detail that does not support the topic sentence.

Recognizing Supporting Details

Read each group of sentences. One of them is a topic sentence, and the other two provide supporting details. Circle the letters of the sentences that provide supporting details.

Recognizing Supporting Details

Read the assigned text. Fill in the concept map. You may not use all of the boxes.

Identifying Supporting Details

Read each pair of sentences. One is a topic sentence. The other is a supporting detail for that topic sentence. Underline the sentence that is a supporting detail.

Identifying Supporting Details

Read the paragraph. Then fill in the missing information in the concept map.

Labels And More

Read the paragraph. Label each sentence. HINT: The sentences are not in order!

Give Me Three!

Add three supporting details to go with each topic sentence.

Writing Supporting Details

Think about someone with whom you are friends. What do you like about this person? Why are you friends with them? Write that person’s name on the line. Then complete the organizer.

Evaluating a Paragraph

Read the assigned paragraph. On the lines below, write down two details that support the topic sentences.